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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

1 edition of Animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington found in the catalog.

Animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington

Animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington

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Published by Oregon State University, School of Forestry, copies available from Forest Research Laboratory, School of Forestry, Oregon State University in Corvallis, Or .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Oregon.,
  • Washington (State)
    • Subjects:
    • Douglas fir -- Wounds and injuries -- Oregon.,
    • Douglas fir -- Wounds and injuries -- Washington (State),
    • Ponderosa pine -- Wounds and injuries -- Oregon.,
    • Ponderosa pine -- Wounds and injuries -- Washington (State),
    • Wildlife depredation -- Oregon.,
    • Wildlife depredation -- Washington (State)

    • Edition Notes

      StatementHugh C. Black ... [et al.].
      SeriesResearch bulletin ;, 25-26, Research bulletin (Oregon State University. Forest Research Laboratory) ;, 25-26.
      ContributionsBlack, Hugh C., 1941-
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsSD12 .O87 no. 25-26, SB608.D6 .O87 no. 25-26
      The Physical Object
      Pagination2 v. :
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4242414M
      LC Control Number80623387

        Mountain beavers are routinely kill trapped for damage control on many forest lands scheduled for planting. Trapping is usually done just prior to planting and repeated 1 or 2 years afterward. Trapping is also repeated when damage is found in established plantations. Consequently, coniferous plantations can and do support wildlife. For example, birds that favour scrub (e.g. warblers), black grouse like young pine trees, night jars, long eared owls and bats appears at dusk and goshawks and osprey nest in tall pines – plus red and roe deer are to be found in plantations.

      8,ha of coniferous plantation in Gwent ha in Glamorgan8. When the trees reach harvesting age there are opportunities for restructuring the habitat, which will lead to diversification of the plant and animal communities they contain. Second rotation forests are more likely therefore to take account of the nature conservation needs. Alternate formats of our educational materials are available upon request for persons with disabilities. Please contact Washington State University Extension for more information. Issued by Washington State University Extension and the U.S. Department of Agriculture in .

      Conifer species from the coastal regions of Washington and Oregon in Northwest America, which have a similar climate to Ireland, have proven to be well adapted to Irish conditions. As a result they have been widely planted in the national afforestation programme, which for many years was confined to . This is a guide to the native conifers of Oregon and Washington. To make the identification of conifers easy, the guide groups them by area and elevation.


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Animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington Download PDF EPUB FB2

Arcl bulletin 25 Cam 0 7 t 5 may animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington dart 1. a survey, Hugh C. Black Edward. Get this from a library. Animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington. Part 1 A survey, [Hugh C Black; Forest Research Laboratory;]. At current rates of planting in Oregon and Washington and at a 3 percent discount rate, animals cause an estimated $60 million annually in damage, reducing the net capitalized value of the timber resource by $ billion.

Likewise, present net worth decreases by 18 percent, and growth and yield by 13 by: 3. Animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington. pt.1, Mammal and bird damage recorded on Douglas-fir and ponderosa pine plots-randomly established in Oregon and Washington duringthen observed for 5 to 10 years-was evaluated for impact on survival and growth.

In all, plots were installed, and 10 of the Cited by: 6. Animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington.

pt.1, a survey, By. Abstract. Mammal and bird damage recorded on Douglas-fir and ponderosa pine\ud plots-randomly established in Oregon and Washington duringthen\ud observed for 5 to 10 years-was evaluated for impact on survival and growth.\ud In all, Contents: Oregon Postmortem School-age children believe the pronghorn antelope, white-tailed deer and elk are in danger of extinction Discontinue the production of calcium cyanide I’ll Take My Steak Bloody Rare, Please.

by Barry Gray NADCA The Animals’ Revenge Animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington Snares Visual scare devices CEQ Uses Statistics Bat.

Chicago Black, Hugh C.,Edward J Dimock, Evans, Rochelle, and Oregon State University. Forest Research Laboratory. Animal Damage to Coniferous Plantations In Oregon and Washington. Abstract. Contents: Oregon Postmortem School-age children believe the pronghorn antelope, white-tailed deer and elk are in danger of extinction Discontinue the production of calcium cyanide I’ll Take My Steak Bloody Rare, Please.

by Barry Gray NADCA The Animals’ Revenge Animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington Snares Visual scare devices CEQ Uses. In Oregon and Washington its range is continuous from the Cascades west to the Pacific Ocean. Edward J., II; Evans, James; Rochelle, James A.

Animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington. Part I. A survey, Res. Bull. Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University, School of Forestry. 43 p. []   Black, H.C., Dimock, E.J., II, Evans, J., and Rochelle, J.A. Animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington.

Part I: a survey, – MLA Brodie, J. Douglas (John Douglas),et al. Animal Damage to Coniferous Plantations In Oregon and Washington. Ii, an Economic Evaluation.: Corvallis, Or.

Native black-tailed jackrabbit populations occur from central Washington east to Missouri and south to coastal Oregon to coastal and Central Valley Edward J., II; Evans, James; Rochelle, James A.

Animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington. Part I. A survey, Res. Bull. Corvallis, OR: Oregon.

Olympic National Park is an American national park located in the State of Washington, on the Olympic Peninsula. The park has four regions: the Pacific coastline, alpine areas, the west side temperate rainforest and the forests of the drier east side.

Within the park there are three distinct ecosystems which are subalpine forest and wildflower meadow, temperate forest, and the rugged Pacific. most comprehensive, the cooperative survey of animal damage to coniferous plantations in Oregon and Washington (Black et al.

Brodie et al. ), evaluates the impact of animal damage on survival and growth of Douglas-fir (Pseudotusuga menziesii) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) plantations. 3rd Revised Edition Field Guide to Pests of Managed Forests in British Columbia () Edited by: Jennifer Burleigh, Tim Ebata, and Harry Kope B.C.

Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource. Black and others surveyed animal damage to conifer plantations in Oregon and Washington based on data obtained from to Snowshoe hare damage was substantial to Douglas-fir plantations; in many cases tree damage was second only to that caused by mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus).

Oregon’s forests are home to an array of wildlife. This interactive guide provides a snapshot of the variety of forest-dwelling animals found in the state. Protecting forestland from development is a great way to minimize habitat loss for species that rely on forests. Forest landowners can also use forest management techniques to maintain, enhance and even create habitat for birds, mammals.

Native Washington Tree Squirrel. The Douglas squirrel, or chickaree (Tamiasciurus douglasii)(Fig. 2) measures 10 to 14 inches in length, including its upper parts are reddish-or brownish-gray, and its underparts are orange to yellowish. The Douglas squirrel is found in stands of fir, pine, cedar, and other conifers in the Cascade Mountains and western parts of Washington.

Fertilization at planting may improve reforestation productivity on sites frequented by ungulates by stimulating rapid growth above the browse line, allowing seedlings to escape animal damage. Additionally, stored nutrients may aid seedlings in recovery from browse damage. High plant nutrient content may, however, deem seedlings more susceptible to ungulate browsing because of increased.

Pine oil, a by-product of the pulp industry, is a feeding repellent to snowshoe hares and voles. In pen trials with snowshoe hares and field trials with voles, when given a choice between food in a pine oil-treated bowl and a control bowl, the animals fed preferentially from the control bowl.

When the hares were presented with food only in a pine oil-treated bowl, two hares showed a reduced. Most of the Oregon Coast Range and the slopes of the Cascade Range as far up as 1, m (4, ft) are covered by Douglas fir and western hemlock.

The Douglas fir produces most of Oregon’s lumber. Above the Douglas fir forest in the Cascades are a variety of coniferous trees, which include white fir, grand fir, mountain hemlock, and pine.Bobcats are not often responsible for killing domestic animals, but occasionally are responsible for losses of poultry, lambs, small goats, pigs, and house cats.

Mostly, bobcats tend to use wild animals as prey items. Once a bobcat causes damage for the first time, it gets easier for the animal to do it again.at Oregon State University and tentatively identified as grouse damage. A to foot accumulation of snow was reported on the area during the winter and spring of / Apparently, the high snow A Figure A clump of Pacific silver fir saplings (A) and a noble fir sapling (B) exhibiting animal damage--removal of terminal buds.